My research combines the tools of nutrition, physiology, microbial ecology, and anthropology to answer critical questions in organismal biology. Specifically, I study the gut microbiota and how its responses to shifts in host diet or physiology affect host nutrition and health. Such interactions are likely to affect host fitness and have important  implications for host ecology and evolution. My work addresses these topics in both non-human primates and humans.

Wednesday
Mar232016

Yearbook of Physical Anthropology Review

Incorporating the gut microbiota into models of human and non-human primate ecology and evolution.

This review explores what gut microbiome research has to offer to biological anthropology and vice versa. Read it.

Wednesday
Mar232016

More howler monkey microbes!

Mantled howler monkeys and black howler monkeys have distinct gut microbiota that appear to respond to variation in habitat (likely via changes in host diet) differently. This is despite the fact that these two howler monkey species are very closely related and have similar ecology. Check it out here.

Wednesday
Mar232016

Is the human gut microbiota unique?

New paper with data showing different reactions of humans and non-human primate gut microbes to similar diets. 

Wednesday
Mar232016

Microbiome Sample Preservation Paper

Data showing that concentrated ethanol does a good job preserving primate fecal samples. Check it out here.

More to come on sample preservation soon!!

Tuesday
Sep012015

New Position

I have officially started as Assistant Professor in the Anthropology Department at Northwestern University. I am very much looking forward to working with my new colleagues and am excited about a variety of collaborations that are currently developing.